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Fireman Sam double entendres 


I’ve covered the topic of double entendres in children’s TV before, and so far Fireman Sam seems to be filled with filth, as the above photo shows! Fireman Sam remains Isla’s favourite show so we have to sit through an episode or two most days, and the innuendos just keep on coming, no pun intended…

Station Officer Steele: Cridlington, you’re licking my strawberry sensation!

Station Officer Steele: Now listen Cridlington, I want to win, so you tiddle those winks like you’ve never tiddled before! Elvis: Yes sir, I’ll do my best tiddling ever!

Station Officer Steele: (talking about apple bobbing) You put your hands behind your back and do it with your mouth!

Ben: Stop for a minute Charlie… Charlie:  But it’s not quite in yet.

Bronwyn: there’s a storm in the way, I can tell when my seaweed gets damp.

Mike Flood: Help! My tool’s weighing me down!

James Jones: I’ve finished polishing the cucumbers Mrs Price!

Ellie Phillips: Shakey-shakey Sam? Fireman Sam: Shakey-shakey Ellie… 😏

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Conceiving with PCOS

To be told that you may struggle to conceive and that you “shouldn’t leave it too long” to have a baby isn’t something any woman wants to hear.

But to be told that you “shouldn’t leave it too long” to start trying when you’ve been in a relationship for just over 6 months is just plain awkward.

I’ll take you back to October 2011, I was 24 and my boyfriend (now husband) and I had just got back from our first holiday when a routine ultrasound scan of my bladder to try and solve the mystery of why I was suffering from so many UTIs (which to this day, remains unsolved) revealed I had polycystic ovary syndrome. The symptoms had always been there (I had, on average, three periods a year that lasted weeks and were insanely heavy) but I hadn’t even thought about trying to get to the bottom of it, at the time my constant UTIs were the more pressing issue.

The consultant then said I shouldn’t leave it much more than a couple of years to try to conceive as the condition would only get worse over time.

So no pressure then…

I then had to go and discuss with my boyfriend that his new girlfriend was “reproductively challenged” to quote Sex and the City, and let’s face it, having THAT conversation so early on could very easily produce a man-shaped hole in the door.

Luckily Now-Hubs was great about it and suggested I get a second opinion, and I’m so glad I did. At this point, all I knew of PCOS was that women who had it really struggled to get pregnant, so all I could envisage were bleak years ahead of us with an endless stream of negative pregnancy tests.

But the wonderful consultant at our nearby Park Hospital not only reassured me that there were plenty of options for women with PCOS, but that the original doctor was irresponsible and out of line for telling me  to hurry up and have a baby when I might not be ready.

We discussed my options and decided to try me on fertility drug Clomid, which I had to take on days 5 to 9 of my cycle and would essentially make me ovulate, when we were ready to start trying. We decided we were ready to try in July 2014 and after the second cycle of Clomid, I took a pregnancy test on Christmas Day that year and it was positive!

My point is that PCOS doesn’t necessarily mean infertility. It might not be easy to conceive, but there are so many treatment options out there now, it’s absolutely not hopeless. If it worked for me, it can work for anyone – although my husband is convinced he’s just got super strong swimmers!!